Map/reducing Luwak

I was inspired, this weekend, by off-list discussion of Luwak and by Guy Steele’s talk How to Think about Parallel Programming—Not!. The two seemed naturally attracted, and thus I created the luwak_mr module.

The luwak_mr module exposes simple a function that knows how to walk a Luwak file tree, and send the keys for each of its leaf nodes off to a Riak map/reduce process. This enables one to run a map function against each block in a luwak file. For example, one might split a large Latin-1 file into “words” (the luwak_mr_words module in the project is an example implementation of the method that Guy Steele presented).

And, yes, this blog has been dormant for a while … I’ve been busy. Lots of woodworking and travel. Making music has also begun to require more time, and yesterday I learned how to ski cross-country. Always busy, the life of a hobbyist.

Update: luwak_mr has also been accepted to the Riak function contrib. So if you’re in the habit of browsing there, fetch the latest.

Vector Clocks on The Basho Blog

Interested in Riak? Wondering about these “vector clock” things? Check out my latest post on The Basho Blog.

As penance for last night’s blathering about shiny new gadgets, I’ve written a post with much more interesting content for The Basho Blog. If you’re picking up Riak and curious about what these “vector clocks” are, and how to use them, have a look.

Webmachine Bloggy Goodness

Webmachine (and Erlang use in general) is picking up. If you’re looking for a few more people to follow in relation to webmachine, I have some suggestions.

A whole bunch of people (no half-bunches in these parts) are picking up Webmachine and writing about their experiences. If you’re looking for a few more people to follow:

Andy Gross (a coworker) is writing about file uploads. Actual webmachine details to follow in his next post – this first one is about the client side of the equation. Update: that second post is up, and includes an example of the new “streamed body” feature in webmachine 1.3.

Seth Falcon is covering the design and implementation of a URL-shortening service. Again, webmachine details to follow, but there’s some good talk about using Mnesia for storage in the current post.

Marc Worrell is laying down the outline of his new CMS, Zophrenic. This looks like a very ambitious project, and I’m anxious to see its release.

Update: More blogs from the comments

Daniel Kwiecinski just covered redirecting (3xx responses), and also recently showed off his own static-file-serving resource. He also tips his hat to wmtrace, so he gets brownie points. 😉

Great reads, but don’t take my word for it.</burton>

Like/Shrug/Dislike Gains Traction

Steven Frank agrees that 3-choice voting (like/shrug/dislike) is plenty. It’s great to see someone else suggest it. Maybe we’ll see it pop up in a few more places.

BeerRiot solves the specific problem Steven is grappling with (the sea of “average” ratings) in another way, as well: all BeerRiot ratings are personalized. You’re less likely to have to deal with a mess of vague ratings on BeerRiot because a social clustering algorithm is being used to sift the wheat from the chaff. BeerRiot can figure out which users’ votes are more important for your score, and uses them to give you a clearer picture. This means the score you see is much more likely to be in-line with your impression of the beer, not just the “average community rating.”

For those interested, here is my reasoning for keeping the ‘neutral’ vote around, in opposition to John Gruber’s suggestion.

WWW is back

Unfortunately, I only found out this morning that some of you probably thought I had given up on BeerRiot. A month or so ago, I started hosting another domain on the same server, and thought I’d set up Yaws to handle that properly. Unfortunately, I botched it bad enough that while beerriot.com still worked, http://www.beerriot.com didn’t. Sorry!

Anyway, things are fixed now, so if you like prepending “www.”, welcome back!

You may have also questioned the lack of new feature announcements of late. The reason behind this is a giant rewrite I’ve been working on all year. More details in a few weeks, but it’s almost an entire redesign that touches every level. At the same time, work has been crazy busy all year. I’m excited to share the new stuff with you all, though, so keep me in your RSS feed, so you don’t miss the announcement.

Ping

Woah – so much for February, eh?

In case people are wondering what’s up in BeerRiot land, here’s the skinny:

January and February were crazy months. I switched day jobs when I switched the calendar, and that meant a lot of extra planning in January, and a lot of extra concentration in February.

Unfortunately, March probably won’t be much different around here. My new day job has a big deadline on April 1, and we’re probably going to be at a dead run from now until then.

But, lucky for me, this doesn’t mean I have to give up Erlang – quite the opposite! In fact, my day job now has me writing Erlang all day long. 🙂 At some point in the future, I hope to be able to reveal where I’m working and what I’m working on, but that’s under wraps at the moment (it’s a new venture that doesn’t want the cat out of the bag just yet).

In the meantime, I do still log in to BeerRiot every night to keep things running. So, if you’re still looking for good beer recommendations, keep checking in.

Downtime

Hi all. In case you’re wondering why BeerRiot has been down most of today – it’s a hardware problem. Something about faulty drives on the machine hosting my VPS, which keeps throwing things into read-only mode.

Hopefully they’ll get it fixed soon.