Making a Kitchen Knife

I once watched a YouTube video about making a knife. Since then, YouTube has recommended more knife-making videos to me than I can remember. This is probably why, when faced with the question of what to make for this year’s family gift exchange, I suddenly thought, “I could try making a knife!”

I traced the profile of one of my favorite knives onto an old table saw blade, following in the footsteps of many a ‘tuber before me, and set to work.

In the course of a couple of weeks, I learned a few things:

And at the end of it, I have two knives I’m quite happy with.

If you would like to fall down the rabbit-hole of hobbyist knife makers, I can also offer you a brand new starting point: my own story of making these knives.

Enjoy!

Turned Kitchen Tool Handles

Pizza cutter, pie server, cheese plane, and ice cream scoop

I wasn’t kidding when I said the shape of my turned tap handle would be a familiar tool-handle shape. I turned the handles above for a Christmas gift this year. They’re an inch or so shorter than the tap handle, with different end diameters to match each tool, but otherwise they’re all the same idea.

Pretty maple grain
Ray flake catches the light

These also have threaded inserts instead of the maple being tapped with threads directly. That will be important for cleaning. These can be spun off of their tool ends easily. Those ends can go through the dishwasher, while the handles get a lighter hand washing.

Turned Tap Handle

I wanted a nicer handle for the tap serving seltzer from my kegerator, so I grabbed a piece of scrap maple and turned one.

I decided to tackle this video differently. Instead of full instructions on how to make the handle, I described the process mostly at a higher level. To help push me through getting it done, I also limited myself to a clip length of four seconds – find something interesting, say something interesting about it, and move on. This video took probably 20% of the time, or less, to edit. It has some rough edges that could have been polished further, but I think it helped me learn that a lot of the feel of the project work can come through, even when many details are left out.